Ground Handling FAA Questions

Presented here are the questions from the FAA test. Read each question and click on the 'Answer' link to determine if your choice is correct or not.

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Chapter 13 Section A is just a review of shop safety

Chapter 13 Section B Flight Line Safety

13B-1

  • During starting of a turbine powerplant using a compressed air starter, a hung start occurred. Select the proper procedure.
    • A — Shut the engine down Answer
    • B — Re-engage the starter Answer
    • C — Advance power level to increase RPM Answer

13B-2

  • A hung start in a jet engine is often caused by
    • A — malfunction in the ignition system Answer
    • B — The starter cutting off to soon Answer
    • C — an excessively rich fuel/air mixture Answer

13B-3

  • Which statement(s) below reflect(s) the typical requirement(s) when towing some aircraft?
  • (1) Discharge all hydraulic pressure to prevent accidental operation of the nose wheel steering mechanism
  • (2) Tailwheel aircraft should be towed backwards
  • (3) If the aircraft has a steerable nosewheel, the torque-link lock should be set to full swivel

13B-4

  • Which statement(s) is/are true regarding tiedown of small aircraft?
  • (1) manila (hemp) rope has a tendency to stretch when it gets wet
  • (2) Nylon or dacron rope is preferred to manila rope.
  • (3) The aircraft should be headed downwind in order to eliminate or minimize wing lift
  • (4) Leave the nosewheel or tailwheel unlocked.

13B-5

  • When approaching the front of an idling jet engine the hazard are extends forward of the engine approcimately

13B-6

  • Which of the following is the most satisfactory extinguishing agent for use on a carburetor or intake fire.

13B-7

  • If a radial engine has been shut down for more than 30 minutes, the propeller should be rotated through at least two revolutions to
    • A — check for hydraulic lock Answer
    • B — check for leaks Answer
    • C — prime the engine Answer

13B-8

  • The priming of a fuel injected horizontally opposed engine is accomplished by placing the fuel control lever in the
    • A — IDLE-CUTOFF position. Answer
    • B — AUTO-RICH position. Answer
    • C — FULL-RICH position. Answer

13B-9

  • The most important condition to be monitored during start after fuel fow beings in a turbine engine is the

13B-10

  • How is a flooded engine, equipped with a float-type carburetor, cleared of excessive fuel?
    • A — Crank the engine with the starter or by hand, with the mixture control in cutoff, ignition switch off, and the throttle fully open, until the fuel charge has been cleared. Answer
    • B — Turn off the fuel and the ignition. Discontinue the starting attempt until the excess fuel has cleared. Answer
    • C — Crank the engine with the starter or by hand, with the mixture control in cutoff, ignition switch on, and the throttle fully open, until the excess fuel has cleared or until the engine starts. Answer

13B-11

  • Generally, when an induction fire occurs during starting of a reciprocating engine, the first course of action should be to
    • A — direct carbon dioxide into the air intake of the engine Answer
    • B — continue cranking and start the engine if possible Answer
    • C — close the throttle. Answer

13B-12

  • When starting and ground operations on aircraft's engine, the aircraft should be positioned to head into the wind primarily
    • A — to aid in achieving and maintaining the proper air flow into the engine induction system. Answer
    • B — to help cancel out engine torque effect. Answer
    • C — for engine cooling purposes. Answer

13B-13

  • When approaching the rear of an idling turbojet engine the hazard are extends aft of the engine approximately

13B-14

  • During starting of a turbojet powerplant using a compressed air starter, a hot start occurrence was recorded. Select what happened from the following
    • A — The pneumatic starting unit overheated. Answer
    • B — the powerplant was preheated before starting. Answer
    • C — The fuel/air mixture was excessively rich. Answer

13B-15

  • When towing a large aircraft
    • A — a person should be in the cockpit to watch for obstruction Answer
    • B — Persons should be stationed at the nose, each wingtip, and the empennage at all times. Answer
    • C — A person should be in the cockpit to operate brakes. Answer

13B-16

  • When taxiing an airplane with a quartering tail-wind, the elevators and
    • A — upwind aileron should be held in the down position Answer
    • B — both ailerons should be kept in the neutral position Answer
    • C — upwind aileron should be held in the up position Answer

13B-17

  • A tailwheel-type aircraft has a greater tendency to weathervane during taxi than a nosewheel-type because on a tailwheel airplane the
    • A — vertical stabilizer to fuselage proportion is greater. Answer
    • B — surface area ratio behind the pivot point (main gear) is greater. Answer
    • C — surface area ratio behind the pivot point (main gear) is less. Answer

13B-18

  • When taxiing (or towing) an aircraft, a flashing red light from the control tower means
    • A — stop and wait for green light. Answer
    • B — Move clear of the runway/taxiway immediately Answer
    • C — return to starting point. Answer

13B-19

  • A person should approach or leave a helicopter in the pilot's field of vision whenever the engine is running in order to avoid
    • A — the tail rotor Answer
    • B — the main rotor Answer
    • C — blowing dust or debris caused by rotor down wash. Answer

13B-20

  • When taxiing (or towing) an aircraft, a flashing white light from the control tower means
    • A — move clear of the runway/taxiway immediately Answer
    • B — OK to proceed but use extreme caution. Answer
    • C — return to starting point. Answer

13B-21

  • When taxiing (or towing) an aircraft, an alternating red and green light from the control tower means
    • A — move clear of the runway/taxiway immediately Answer
    • B — Ok to proceed but use extreme caution Answer
    • C — return to starting point Answer

13B-22

  • When stopping a nosewheel-type airplane after taxiing (or towing), the nosewheel should be left
    • A — unlocked Answer
    • B — turned at a small angle Answer
    • C — pointed straight ahead Answer

13B-23

  • When first starting to move an aircraft while taxiing, it is important to
    • A — test the brakes Answer
    • B — closely monitor the instruments Answer
    • C — notify the control tower. Answer

13B-24

  • Which of the following conditions has the most potential for causing engine damage when starting or attempting to start a turbine engine?

13B-25

13B-26

  • (Refer to General Figure 51.) Which marshalling signal should be given if a taxiing aircraft is in imminent danger of striking an object?

13B-27

  • (Refer to General Figure 51.) Which marshalling signal should be given if a taxiing aircraft is in imminent dange of striking an object?

13B-28

  • How much current does a 30-volt 1/2 horsepower motor that is 85-percent efficient draw from the bus? (Note: 1 horsepower = 746 watts)

13B-29

  • Weathervaning tendency is greatest when taxiing
    • A — a tailwheel-type aircraft in a direct crosswind Answer
    • B — a nosewheel-type aircraft in a quartering head wind Answer
    • C — both nosewheel and tailwheel-type aircraft in quartering tailwind Answer

13B-30

  • When approaching the rear of and idling turbojet or turbofan engine, the hazard area extends aft of the engine approximately

Chapter 13 Section C Servicing Aircraft

13C-1

  • What effect, if any, will aviation gasoline mixed with jet fuel have on a turbine engine?
    • A — no appreciable effect. Answer
    • B — The tetraethyl lead in the gasoline forms deposits on the turbine blades. Answer
    • C — The tetraethyl lead in the gasoline forms deposits on the compressor blades. Answer

13C-2

  • (1) Jet fuel is of higher viscosity than aviation gasoline and therefore holds contaminants more readily.
  • (2) Viscosity has no relation to contamination of fuel.
    • A — only No. 1 is true Answer
    • B — Both No. 1 and No. 2 are true. Answer
    • C — Neither No. 1 nor No.2 are true. Answer

13C-3

  • The color of 100ll fuel is

13C-4

  • How are aviation fuels, which possess greater anti-knock qualities than 100 octane, classified?
    • A — According to the milliliters of lead. Answer
    • B — By reference to normal heptane. Answer
    • C — By performance numbers. Answer

13C-5

  • Why is ethylene dibromide added to aviation gasoline?
    • A — To remove zin silicate deposits from the spark plugs. Answer
    • B — To scavenge lead oxide from the cylinder combustion chambers. Answer
    • C — To increase the anti-knock rating of the fuel. Answer

13C-6

  • Both gasoline and kerosene have certain advantages for use as turbine fuel, Which statement is true in reference to the advantage of each?
    • A — Kerosene has a higher heat energy/value per unit weight than gasoline. Answer
    • B — Gasoline has a higher heat energy/ value per unit volume than kerosene. Answer
    • C — Kerosene has a higher heat energy/ value per unit volume than gasoline. Answer

13C-7

  • What must accompany fuel vaporization?
    • A — An absorption of heat. Answer
    • B — a decrease in vapor pressure. Answer
    • C — A reduction in volume. Answer

13C-8

  • Characteristics of detonation are
    • A — Cylinder pressure remains the same, excessive cylinder head temperature, and a decrease in engine power. Answer
    • B — rapid rise in cylinder pressure, excessive cylinder head temperature, and a decrease in engine power. Answer
    • C — rapid rise in cylinder pressure, cylinder head temperature is normal, and a decrease in engine power. Answer

13C-9

  • A fuel that vaporizes to readily may cause

13C-10

  • Jet fuel number identifiers are
    • A — performance numbers to designate the volatility of the fuel. Answer
    • B — performance numbers and are relative to the fuel's performance in the aircraft engine. Answer
    • C — type numbers and have no relation to the fuel's performance in the aircraft engine. Answer

13C-11

  • The main differences between grades 100 and 100LL fuel are
    • A — volatility and lead content. Answer
    • B — volatility and lead content, and color. Answer
    • C — lead content and color. Answer

13C-12

  • Characteristics of aviation gasoline are
    • A — high heat value, high volatility Answer
    • B — high heat value, low volatility Answer
    • C — low heat value, low volatility Answer

13C-13

  • Tetraethyl lead is added to aviation gasoline to
    • A — retard the formation of corrosives Answer
    • B — improve the gasolines' performance in the engine Answer
    • C — dissolve the moisture in gasoline. Answer

13C-14

  • A fuel that does not vaporize readily enough can cause
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