Safety On The Flight Line
  • Hearing Protection
    • Continued exposure to noise can permanently damage your ears and impair your hearing.
      • Wear either external protection such as a pair of large earphones, or internal protectors that fit into the auditory canal of the ear.
  • Foreign Object Damage (FOD)
    • Can be any debris such as nuts, bolts and safety wire that is drawn into the inlet of a turbine engine, or through the arc of a rotating propeller blade, they can easily cause damage that can lead to catastrophic failure.
    • Personal Safety Practices
      • Aircraft operating their engines must illuminate their navigation lights and rotating beacons
      • A second person should be stationed on the ground to warn anyone in the area.
  • Safety Around Helicopters
    • When the engine is operating and the rotor turning, be sure to stay in the pilot's field of vision in order to remain clear of the tail rotor.
  • Tiedown Procedures - The most severe damage to aircraft in the United States, come form tornados and hurricanes.
    • The best protective measure you can take to protect an aircraft is to place it in a hanger, if there isn't one available it should be securely tied down and its controls firmly locked in place.
      • Batten Boards - Are used to prevent a control surface from moving and maintain it in a streamline position.
        • they are painted red and have a long red streamer attached so they are easy to see
    • If a tail-wheel aircraft is tied down facing into the wind, its elevator should be locked in the full up position, it its facing away from thew ind, the elevator should be locked in the full down position.
    • All engine openings should be covered to keep blowing dirt from entering the engine compartment and the engine itself and pitots should be covered to exclude water and dirt
    • When parked, an aircrafts nosewheel should be locked in the a straight position so the aircraft cannot move from side to side or weathervane in the wind.
    • Nylon is the strongest material for rope, though Dacron and yellow Polypropylene also proved sufficient strength.
      • Manila rope should be avoided, since it has a tendency to shrink when it gets wet, and mildew and rot from exposure to weather.
      • Use Bowline knots when securing tiedowns, proper tension would allow for one inch of movement.
    • Seaplanes - Secure them by towing into shallow water or onto a beach, or secure them to a dock or tree.
    • Skiplanes - Pack loose snow around the skis then douse with water so they freeze in place or freeze the ropes into ice (Deadman Anchor)
    • Helicopters - Helicopter should be headed into the wind clear of all other structures and aircraft by at least a rotor span, and the skids should be securely tied down.
  • Engine Starting Procedures
    • Reciprocating Engines
      • Hand Propping
    • Turbine Engines
      • Hot Starts
      • Hung Starts
      • Turbine Start Procedures
  • Taxiing Aircraft
    • Tailwheel Aircraft
    • Light Signals
  • Towing
  • Helicopter Ground Handling

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